workplace

Social Engineering: How Most Hackers Get Access To Workplace Data

Social Engineering: How Most Hackers Get Access To Workplace Data

A technology security firm conducted a survey of security industry experts on current security risks.

Over 70 percent of those surveyed say the biggest security threat comes from inside the organization, and the most popular way for hackers to get inside is through social engineering.

Kicking The E-Cigarette Out Of The Workplace

Kicking The E-Cigarette Out Of The Workplace

A recent survey by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) found that 85 percent of workplaces have a smoking policy, and that 44 percent of respondents indicated that vaping (the use of electronic cigarettes or other personal vaporizers that atomize nicotine liquid) is addressed in their organizations' smoking policies. In addition, one-third of organizations surveyed that currently had no vaping policy plan to create one this year.

Small And Large Employers Alike Are Feeling The Impact Of The ACA

Small And Large Employers Alike Are Feeling The Impact Of The ACA

A human resource consulting firm recently released the results of its annual survey on employer-sponsored health care plans. One piece of good news from the survey is that average health care costs per employee experienced a smaller increase this year (3.8 percent) as compared to the increase in 2014. This is the third year in a row in which increases have been below four percent.

Attitude Versus Skills: What Is More Important To Your Workplace?

Attitude Versus Skills: What Is More Important To Your Workplace?

Software developer, Instructure, surveyed almost 750 managers from U.S. businesses in a variety of industries to find out what they believe are important attributes for entry-level hires.

Nearly all managers surveyed stated a candidate's attitude and work ethic were the most important characteristic they considered when hiring entry-level positions, with 85 percent choosing work ethic as the most important aspect of success. Seventy-nine percent of respondents stated that a candidate's impressive college schooling was the least important factor in their hiring decision.